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Graham Attwell :: Blog :: Personal Learning Environments

May 07, 2007

Here are the slides from a presentation I have made at the University of South Denmark Knowledge Laboratory conference on Scaffolding Learning: web 2.0 and ePortfolios.

 If you head over to my main blog - the Wales Wide Web you can listen to the 35 minute audio of my talk. 


Posted by Graham Attwell


Comments

  1. Bravo!Smile

    That’s the perspective we should be adopting if we want to keep up to our students’ expectations and demands. If we don’t, there is no doubt that we are going to lose our student audience to the ones who will.

    Today’s Learners are not as passive as they used to be years ago. The mere transmission of (static) knowledge means little to them. Hasn’t it always? But now, more than ever, there is the opportunity for individuals to interact directly with information and personalize their learning path in a way it wasn’t thought to be possible a couple of years ago. There is new information flowing and growing on a regular basis. It is a fact and it is only a click away. And most learners – especially younger generations - are part of that process, because they connect to the network, and because they are networking themselves, through all the facilities www offers them. They are also enthusiastic about it.

    And so, why should their academic lives be different?  Why shouldn’t teachers – do we still have to call them teachers? – be supportive of the use of Web 2.0 to enhance learning?

    What students want is “action”. They don’t want to be told things. They expect learning to be a relevant activity for their brains and not a simple memorization exercise. At least I did as a student! And I still do, as someone who needs to engage in discussions, like this one, constantly to keep updated. 

    When joining a University – Universitas from Latin, means the whole, total, the Universe! - we have to be able to provide them with that world (of information), where people connect, interact, communicate and engage meaningfully and in context; where different perspectives coexist. It is the web in its inclusive approach. Everyone can take part in it, formal or informally. If we are to miss that, then we are the ones being excluded from this big mesh of information.  

    My main problem here is: how do we convince teachers to let go of their central, know-it-all position and be part of the learning process as a guide?

    How do we tell teachers web 2.0 is OK. It is not there to replace them, but it is indeed changing their role as educators?

    Great Presentation! Wink

    Clap!Clap!Clap!

    Thanks for sharing. You raised a lot of good issues there, which stimulate meto write a looooooong comment!   Cool Sorry about that!

    Cristina CostaCristina Costa on Tuesday, 08 May 2007, 09:58 BST # |

  2. Excellent to the point, I'd forward the message here at Swansea

    KemiKemi on Tuesday, 08 May 2007, 12:24 BST # |

  3. Thanks for your looong comment Cristina. As to the question of "how do we convince teachers to let go of their central, know-it-all position and be part of the learning process as a guide?

    How do we tell teachers web 2.0 is OK. It is not there to replace them, but it is indeed changing their role as educators?"

    The answer is by involving them practically. There is limited value in trying to tell them - though I enjoy trying. The thing we have to do is involve teachers in practice. So far we haven't done too well at that.  

    Graham AttwellGraham Attwell on Wednesday, 09 May 2007, 15:17 BST # |

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